ABOUT

The Task Force for Global Health provides all people with opportunities to lead healthy, productive lives.

CONTACT 

330 West Ponce de Leon Ave.
Decatur, Georgia, 30030

T: (404) 592-1458  1-800-765-7173

E: info@medsurplusalliance.org

WEBSITE RESOURCES

Terms & Conditions
Privacy Policy
Sitemap

© 2018 by MedSurplus Alliance

SUBSCRIBE TO  THE TASK FORCE NEWSLETTER

Each month, we’ll send you our e-newsletter with the latest about our work around the world.  If you are in the European Union,  sign up here

CONNECT. LEARN. SHARE. COMMIT.

FOLLOW US ON Facebook.

Donations in Emergency Situations

 

6.1 Donations in Emergency Situations – General

 

6.1.1 General – Emergency Needs Assessment

 

Donations should only be made based on an expressed need, at the request of the in-country partner, and after a thorough needs assessment confirms that the donation is appropriate for the setting.

 

In addition to the general and specific product donations standards, the following factors should be considered when determining whether or not to donate during a disaster.

 

6.1.1.1 During a disaster, MSROs should determine whether the local population is participating in any assessments and product requests and respond accordingly.

 

6.1.1.2 During a disaster, MSROs should determine whether outside aid is being accepted and has been requested and respond accordingly.

 

6.1.1.3 During a disaster, MSROs should determine whether other organizations are responding and, when possible, determine if multiple requests have been made for the same product by more than one organization and respond accordingly.

 

6.1.1.4 During a disaster, MSROs should determine whether there is an expedited plan in place for vetting new partners and respond accordingly.

 

6.1.1.5 During a disaster, MSROs should evaluate unusually large requests to avoid sending an excess product that might create a disposal issue for the recipient and respond accordingly.

 

6.1.1.6 During a disaster, MSROs should verify customs clearance procedures to determine if they have been waived, modified or forbid emergency medical donations and respond accordingly

 

Guidance & Resources

 

It is extremely difficult during an emergency situation or humanitarian crisis to get accurate information or conduct a needs assessment. Assessments are best handled by in-country experts or in-country recipient partner staff so that questions are answered within the event operating environment.  Most aid organizations, including MSROs, are better positioned to respond to a crisis during the recovery phase when the needs can be more accurately determined.  Conference call briefings provided by international humanitarian aid organizations are one way to attain accurate situation assessments, identify collaboration partners, and determine if and when to respond.

 

WHO Technical Guidelines in Emergencies

This website resource contains links to helpful information on emergency situation needs assessment and effective response mobilization. Resources include myths and realities, natural disaster profiles, and standard health kit descriptions.

(Source: World Health Organization Humanitarian Health Action)

 

Checklist for Effective Disaster Response: Insights for Wise Humanitarian Action 

This checklist was created to help aid organizations determine what an appropriate response is during a disaster situation.  

(Source: Philanthropy Now/ The Raqim Foundation)

 

6.1.2 General – Short-Dated Products

 

 During a disaster, product donations should be held to the same quality standards as they are in non-disaster situations.  Products must be used prior to the expiry date.

 

6.1.2.1 MSROs should document requests for short-dated product including who is requesting the product, why it is requested, and how it will be transported and used prior to the expiration date. 

 

Guidance & Resources 

 

There are times that short-dated products or products not approved in a recipient country are donated during a crisis and can be used safely. This is because the products are often airlifted and used immediately or within a very short period of time.   For example, medical teams' hand-carried products and larger airlifts arrive in days as opposed to the months-long ocean freight process. However, short-dated or other donations exceptions should never be made without being specifically requested by those responding to the disaster, and after confirming their capacity to use the products prior to expiration. Once approved, products should be processed and packaged in the same manner as non-emergency shipments and sent by the most expeditious means available.

Guidelines for Medicine Donations

This WHO resource provides a set of recommended guidelines for general medicine donation with specific areas focused on donations in emergency situations.  The guidelines are intended to improve the quality of medicine donations in international development assistance and emergency aid.

(Source: The World Health Organization)

 

The Interagency Emergency Health Kit 2011

UN agencies and international and nongovernmental organizations are increasingly called upon to respond to large‐scale emergencies to prevent and manage serious threats to the survival and health of affected populations. Medicines and medical devices (renewable and equipment) have been supplied by relief agencies for decades. In the 1980s, the World Health Organization facilitated a process to encourage the standardization of medicines and medical devices needed in emergencies to allow for efficient and effective responses to the need for medicines and medical devices. This initial work led to the supply of standard, pre‐packed kits that could be kept in readiness to meet priority health needs in emergencies. The concept of the emergency health kit has been adopted by many organizations and national authorities as a reliable, standardized, affordable, and quickly available source of the essential medicines and medical devices (renewable and equipment) urgently needed in a disaster situation. Its content is based on the health needs of 10,000 people for a period of three months. This document provides background information on the composition and use of the emergency health kit. 

(Source: The World Health Organization)

 

 

6.2 Donations in Emergency Situations – Consumables

 

6.2.1 Consumables – Emergency Needs Assessment

 

Emergency consumable product donations should only be made based on an expressed need, at the request of the in-country partner, and after a thorough needs assessment confirms that the donation is appropriate for the setting. In addition to the general and specific product donations standards, the following factors should be considered when determining whether or not to donate during a disaster.

6.2.1.1 During a disaster, MSROs should process and package approved emergency consumable products in the same manner as non-emergency shipments.

 

6.2.1.2 During a disaster, MSROs should send approved shipments of consumables by the most expeditious means available.

 

Guidance & Resources

 

Proper packaging is especially important in an emergency operating environment where it can be difficult to protect donated products from heat, water, and other environmental challenges.

 

Disaster Emergency Needs Assessment: Disaster Preparedness Training Programme

This resource, provided by the International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, includes resources on disaster needs assessment, disaster needs assessment reporting, emergency response based on emergency assessments, and assessment tools including checklists, gap identification charts, and questionnaires.

(Source: International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies)

 

WHO Technical Guidelines in Emergencies

This website resource contains links to helpful information on emergency situation needs assessment and effective response mobilization. Resources include myths and realities, natural disaster profiles, and standards health kit descriptions.

(Source: World Health Organization Humanitarian Health Action)

 

6.3 Donations in Emergency Situations – Medical Equipment

6.3.1 Medical Equipment – Emergency Needs Assessment

 

Emergency medical equipment donations should only be made based on an expressed need, at the request of the in-country partner, and after a thorough needs assessment confirms that the donation is also appropriate for the setting. In addition to the general and specific product donations standards, the following factors should be considered when determining whether or not to donate during a disaster.

 

6.3.1.1 During a disaster, MSROs should process and package approved emergency medical equipment donations in the same manner as non-emergency shipments.

 

6.3.1.2 During a disaster, MSROs should send approved shipments of medical equipment donations by the most expeditious means available.

 

Guidance & Resources

 

As a general rule, medical equipment should not be donated in emergency situations unless it is established that the equipment will be used after the disaster. Items should not be donated that have not been specifically requested and medical equipment should not be donated if the recipient has not demonstrated that they have the needed capacity and training to handle the item correctly.  

 

WHO Technical Guidelines in Emergencies

This website resource contains links to helpful information on emergency situation needs assessment and effective response mobilization. Resources include myths and realities, natural disaster profiles, and standards health kit descriptions.

(Source: World Health Organization Humanitarian Health Action)

 

The Interagency Emergency Health Kit 2011

UN agencies and international and nongovernmental organizations are increasingly called upon to respond to large‐scale emergencies to prevent and manage serious threats to the survival and health of affected populations. Medicines and medical devices (renewable and equipment) have been supplied by relief agencies for decades. In the 1980s, the World Health Organization facilitated a process to encourage the standardization of medicines and medical devices needed in emergencies to allow for efficient and effective responses to the need for medicines and medical devices. This initial work led to the supply of standard, pre‐packed kits that could be kept in readiness to meet priority health needs in emergencies. The concept of the emergency health kit has been adopted by many organizations and national authorities as a reliable, standardized, affordable, and quickly available source of the essential medicines and medical devices (renewable and equipment) urgently needed in a disaster situation. Its content is based on the health needs of 10,000 people for a period of three months. This document provides background information on the composition and use of the emergency health kit. 

(Source: The World Health Organization)

 

6.4 Donations in Emergency Situations – Pharmaceuticals

6.4.1 Pharmaceuticals – Emergency Needs Assessment

 

During a disaster, pharmaceutical product donations should be held to the same quality standards as in non-disaster situations.  Products must be used prior to the expiry date. In addition to the general and specific product donations standards, the following factors should be considered when determining whether or not to donate during a disaster.

 

6.4.1.1 MSROs should document requests for short-dated pharmaceutical products including who is requesting the product, why it is requested, and how it will be transported and used prior to the expiration date. 

 

Guidance & Resources

 

Having established processes in place in the recipient country will speed up needs assessment and logistic operations during an emergency.  If the organization can’t do the assessment in the country or work with an existing trusted partner, then pharmaceutical donations should not be made.

 

Guidelines for Medicine Donations

This WHO resource provides a set of recommended guidelines for general medicine donation with specific areas focused on donations in emergency situations. The guidelines are intended to improve the quality of medicine donations in international development assistance and emergency aid.

(Source: World Health Organization)